Advancing Methods and Measures to Examine the Underlying Mechanisms of Violent Death for LGBTQ Populations

September 2022

Date and Time TBD

About the Webinar

In this webinar, methods and measures are presented to enhance data collection efforts on violent deaths among LGBTQ populations. Due to multiple minority stressors, LGBTQ individuals are at increased risk for suicide and violent death. Health risk literature suggests that LGBTQ people are more likely to die by violent death than their non-LGBTQ peers (e.g., LGBTQ people are over 2-4 times more likely to attempt suicide than non-LGBTQ people), but because Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (SOGI) data are not systematically collected at the time of the death, actual mortality disparities are unknown. This research fills a glaring gap in LGBTQ research and will transform mortality data collection to include SOGI, which facilitates studies to guide prevention and intervention research around preventable deaths among LGBTQ populations. The researchers will discuss both the predisposing and precipitating factors associated with violent death and the efforts to measure SOGI using postmortem data when there is a violent death among LGBTQ individuals. In addition, they will present findings on data collection from the National Violent Death System to better understand the violent death among LGBTQ individuals and test the feasibility of collecting sexual orientation and gender identity after a violent death has occurred. Together, these researchers present evidenced based data collection techniques that demonstrate the need for better reporting of mortality data for LGBTQ populations.


About the Speakers

Vickie Mays, Ph.D.

Vickie Mays, Ph.D.
Professor
University of California, Los Angeles

Dr. Vickie Mays is a Professor in the Department of Psychology in the College of Letters and Sciences and the Department of Health Services at UCLA. Dr. Mays is also the Director of the UCLA Center on Research, Education, Training and Strategic Communication on Minority Health Disparities. She teaches courses on health status and health behaviors of racial and ethnic minority groups, research ethics in biomedical and behavioral research in racial/ethnic minority populations, research methods in minority research, social determinants of mental disorders, and psychopathology. She holds a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology and an M.S.P.H. in Health Services, with postdoctoral training in psychiatric epidemiology, survey research as it applies to ethnic minorities (University of Michigan), and health policy (RAND).

Professor Mays’ research primarily focuses on the mental and physical health disparities affecting racial and ethnic minority populations. She has a long history of research and policy development in the area of contextual factors surrounding HIV/AIDS in racial and ethnic minorities. Other areas of research include examining the role of perceived and actual discrimination on mental and physical health outcomes, particularly as these factors impact downstream disease outcomes, and examining the availability, access, and quality of mental health services for racial, ethnic, and sexual minorities. She is the Co-PI of the California Quality of Life Survey, a population based study of over 2,200 Californians on the prevalence of mental health disorders and the contextual factors associated with those disorders.

Dr. Mays has provided testimony to several Congressional committees on her HIV, mental health, and health disparities research findings. She recently completed a term as the Chair of the Subcommittee on Populations of the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics. Dr. Mays has received numerous awards including one for her lifetime research on women and HIV from AMFAR, a Women and Leadership Award from the American Psychological Association, and several Distinguished Contributions for Research awards.

Susan Cochran, Ph.D.

Susan Cochran, Ph.D.
Professor
University of California, Los Angeles

Dr. Susan Cochran is Professor of Epidemiology in the Fielding School of Public Health at UCLA and Professor of Statistics in the UCLA College of Letters and Science. She received her A.B. in Anthropology from UCLA, her M.A. in Counseling Psychology from Loyola Marymount University, her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from UCLA and later her M.S. in Epidemiology from UCLA with support from an NIMH Scientist Development Award. By training, Dr. Cochran is both a psychologist and an epidemiologist. Reflecting that, her interests lie in understanding how psychological and social factors influence health. In particular, Dr. Cochran’s work focuses on understanding the role of social stigma and discrimination in health care access, health behaviors, mental health, and health outcomes. She has received several awards for her research and contributions to the University including the American Psychological Association’s Distinguished Contribution to Research in Public Policy Award and the UCLA Chancellor’s Award for Special Contributions to a Fair and Open Academic Environment.


About the Moderator

Tamara Lewis Johnson, M.P.H., M.B.A.

Tamara Lewis Johnson, M.P.H., M.B.A.
Chief, Women’s Health Research Program
Office for Disparities Research and Workforce Diversity, NIMH

Ms. Tamara Lewis Johnson is the Chief of the Women’s Health Research Program for the Office for Disparities Research and Workforce Diversity. She is responsible for providing advice and guidance on matters relating to women’s health research and mental health. Ms. Lewis Johnson brings 11 years of experience in health science management from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) where she served as a Health Science Specialist in the Division of Extramural Activities’ Office of Extramural Research Policy Operations. Ms. Lewis Johnson supported the development of initiatives to promote investments in biomedical research that advance public health outcomes. She has produced reports that describe the importance of infectious and immune-mediated research initiatives to congressional staffers, scientific organizations, and constituency groups. Her expertise in systems engineering, implementation science, and operations research has enabled her to advance translational research that can be used in low-income settings in the United States and abroad. Ms. Lewis Johnson has been instrumental in the development of scientific workgroups to advance public health outcomes through the support of discovery science to advance improved diagnostics, drug development, and vaccine research. She also served as the Senior Program Manager for Women’s Health for the Office of Special Populations and Research Training where she was responsible for managing research and training initiatives related to women’s health research in infectious diseases and immune-mediated illnesses.

Prior to her work at NIAID, Ms. Lewis Johnson worked at the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) as the Women’s Health Team Lead and Acting Deputy Director of the Office of Women and Minority’s Health (OMWH), at HRSA’s Bureau of Primary Health Care (BPHC). Ms. Johnson holds two master’s Degrees, one in Business Administration and one in Public Health, with a concentration in Health Services Management, from the University of California, Berkeley, as well as a bachelor’s degree in Industrial Engineering from Stanford University.